DIYs to Bring the Seaside Home

I’ve just returned from a wonderful stay by the seaside in Devon, a favourite of the TFD household when we’re in need of some R&R. We go at least once a year and make sure to stay right on the seafront where we sit with endless cups of tea and lots of books (I finished 3 last week, a new personal record!).

A blue seaside scene with two sail boats on the horizon

I love being by the sea and every time I’m there I can’t help but become more inspired than ever. The last week was no exception and, although I’m pining to be back on the beach with the sand between my toes, I’m also feeling refreshed and my mind is now bursting with ideas! I’m lucky enough to really enjoy my job, but there’s something about clearing your mind of the everyday and getting away from the 9 to 5 that just helps to recharge those creative batteries!

I live nowhere near the sea, so I love to include beach inspired elements in my home decor to remind me to stay inspired. In this post I’m going to show you a couple of my favourite, super easy (and I seriously mean super easy!) seaside inspired crafts, perfect for city homes and coastal dwellings alike.

 

Driftwood star

A small DIY star made from lots of small driftwood sticks.

A group of images showing how to DIY your own seaside driftwood star.

Cut a circle from some sturdy cardboard and use a glue gun to fix drift wood in place all the way around. Yes, it’s as easy as that!

 

A trio of images depicting a seaside themed pendant made of pebbles, seaside themed beads and buttons. Another picture shows some clear fishing line used in the DIY.

Thread clear fishing line through pebbles and shells with holes in to create a nautical pendant that you can hang anywhere in your home. I’ve also added some freshwater pearls, buttons and other nautical treasures to give a pop of colour!

A seaside scene showing waves ebbing against the shore with a blue sky in the background.

Let me know if you gave these DIYs a go, I’d really like to see how they turned out. I would love to hear from you if you have any tips for my next visit to Devon too!

 

Living Room Makeover: Geometric Feature Wall

A room with a geometric feature wall painted with geometric triangular shapes in navy, grey and sage green, with a giant anglepoise floor lamp and some metal shelves.

Our house is a new build and, as with many new builds, we were advised not to paint the walls for the first 18 months. This is a rule that we stuck to, but I’ve been longing to give our living room a statement wall for months, so I was hitting up the local DIY shops as soon as we reached the point that we were allowed to paint!

I’m never one to shy away from a bold decor statement, and having had the last year and a half to plan I decided that instead of picking one paint colour, I wanted to pick three. Finally, last weekend, armed with some Frog Tape and a paint roller, I set to work on my long awaited geometric masterpiece, and I’m so pleased with how it turned out that I’m going to share with you how I did it!

A room with a geometric feature wall painted with geometric triangular shapes in navy, grey and sage green, with a black sofa and a vintage navy trunk, a large floor lamp and some metal shelves.

Take some time to plan the shapes you would like, where you want your lines to sit and what colour you want each shape to be. I sketched out lots of different designs and picked a favourite before I set to work marking it out on the wall using masking tape.

Ideally you will use a laser level to get the masking tape lines perfectly straight on the wall, but if, like me, you don’t have access to one of these magical tools, I can reassure you that it is still possible to get the lines straight by eye. Just take a step back each time you apply some tape and re-adjust as necessary. Your lines won’t be perfect, but honestly, no-one will notice!

Top tip: Make sure you use a good quality masking tape for this project. My go-to is Frog Tape. You want your lines to be as clean as possible and by using cheaper masking tape you can run the risk of your paint lines bleeding into each other. Not a good look!

A plain white wall with masking tape laid out to make geometric shapes.
I chose to bring the shapes in my feature wall out slightly onto the adjacent walls. I feel that this adds to the impact whilst also tying the room together a little more.

You will also want to mask off the areas that you don’t want to paint, like skirting boards, the ceiling, plug sockets, and so on. My wall also had a radiator on, which I chose to take down so that I could paint behind it.

2 plug sockets with masking tape around the edges.

Once you’ve masked off all of the necessary areas and made sure that your floor and furniture are all sufficiently covered by a protective sheet, it’s time to get painting!

A geometric feature wall in the midst of being decorated. The floor is covered with a plastic sheet and the walls are partially painted.

Once you have filled in all of your geometric shapes with paint and they are completely dry, you can gently pull off the masking tape. You’re not finished yet though! Obviously, the parts of the wall that were hidden under the masking tape will be unpainted, leaving gaps between each shape. You may want to keep these lines, but for me, it wasn’t the look I was aiming for so I  masked up the areas next to these unpainted lines and filled in the gaps.

A geometric feature wall painted with triangular shapes in navy, grey and sage green. There are white lines between each painted triangle and dotted lines have been drawn to show where the masking tape should go.

A feature wall painted with geometric triangular shapes in navy, grey and sage green. There are white lines between each triangle and coloured lines have been drawn to show which areas need to be painted over.

Once again, you will need to wait for the paint to dry. Then, once you’ve removed the masking tape (again!) you’re done. You have the geometric feature wall of your dreams!

A blank white wall with 6 framed pictures on it and with a black sofa, a large lamp and a set of metal shelves in front.
Before
A room with a geometric feature wall painted with triangular shapes in navy, grey and sage green, with a black sofa and a vintage navy trunk, a large floor lamp and some metal shelves.
After

I’m so excited to have tackled my first big painting project in the house. It was a bold move, but I really feel that it’s made the living room a much more cohesive space.

Let me know if you decide to give this a go. I would love to hear how it turns out!

Floating Frame DIY

I love crafting and I’m always looking for creative ways to display the things that I’ve made and pieces of artwork that I’ve found. I’ve recently discovered an incredibly easy way to create beautifully minimalist floating frames out of things that you will probably have already lying round your home, and I wanted to share it with you!

All you will need:

2 bulldog clips and 2 matching picture frames

 

You will only need the glass from the picture frames, so they don’t need to be particularly fancy. I chose to use some basic clip frames, which you can find in a variety of sizes in most homeware shops.

Once you’ve removed the glass from each frame you can slot your chosen artwork in between the two panes and use a bulldog clamp on each side to hold them together (whilst, of course, being careful of any sharp edges and taking care not to break the glass!).

That’s it. That’s all you need to do. I told you it was easy!

 

2 floating frames, one with colourful confetti in and one with pressed flowers

 

The frames that I have made are 13cm x 18cm and I only need to use a couple of small bulldog clips. For bigger frames you can use bigger clips, and you may need to use more than 2.

 

One floating frame with a polaroid picture in

I love how versatile these frames are. They suit a wide range of decor styles because of how minimalist they look. It’s also so quick and easy to swap out what’s inside and they’re a great way to display all kinds of keepsakes. I’ve filled my frames with polaroids, small paintings, pressed flowers and colourful confetti, but the possibilities are endless!

 

One floating frame with a small watercolour painting of two roses and some leaves

 

A floating frame with some pressed flowers in

 

I would love to see what you use your floating frames for. Get in touch and let me know what you come up with!